Recovery to energy

Maximising the potential of the scrapping process

Energy from waste can play an important role in the energy mix that we need to power our modern economies. But we at Toyota consider this to be the option of last resort. We strive to ensure that from both our operations and products every last resource is recovered before this option is considered.

The importance of waste hierarchy

We recognise the value of the waste hierarchy system for understanding the relative value of the different methods we use to achieve environmentally responsible operations. This places prevention – avoiding using energy and natural resources – as the best option, progressing through minimisation, reuse, recycling and energy recovery to disposal as the least-favoured option.

If we have done a good job in reducing, reusing and recycling materials and resources, then we should have only a limited need to deal with whatever remains through energy recovery or disposal.

"How can you expect to do your job without getting your hands dirty!"

Kiichiro Toyoda, Founder Toyota Motor Corporation

Recovering energy from the remaining residues of a recycled car is the final option before ultimate waste.

Energy recovery from end-of-life vehicle scrapping

After cars have been cleared of any polluting materials and stripped of parts that can be reused or recycled, the shells are crushed and shredded. Metals and plastics are separated out from the shredded matter, leaving a substance called ASR – Automotive Shredder Residue.

Even though this is made up of fragments of glass, rubber, plastics and dirt, it can still be put to use. Using innovative Post Shredder Technology we can recover even fractionally small pieces of material. Only after this thorough sorting does any remaining material that cannot be saved go for energy recovery or, as a last resort, incineration.

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ASR – Automotive Shredder Residue, what remains after shredding and post-shredding.
Recovery in our operations

Our production processes obviously create some surplus and waste materials, so it is important we keep these to a minimum and recover as much as possible for recycling or reuse.

When we make parts or vehicles, there is often surplus or waste material left over, whether it be metals, plastics, paints or water. We need to be sure we recover everything we can, so that it can be reused, recycled or disposed of responsibly, without risking any harm to the environment.

We take all due care to offset waste and to reuse and recycle material wherever possible, at every stage in our production processes. We make sure that ultimately any waste or surplus material is used for energy recovery as a last resort.

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